Definitions


Acetubulum

The hip socket, inside of the hip bone, or pelvis

Avascular Necrosis

A disease where the femur’s femoral head dies. Avascular necrosis creates tiny fractures in the femoral head, or top of the thigh bone. This can lead to the bone collapsing. According the National Institutes of Health, bones normally break down and rebuild continuously and repair themselves after a break. The process keeps the skeletal system strong and maintains a balance of minerals in this system. With avascular necrosis, this process is hampered by the lack of blood supply, the rebuilding of the bone is prevented, and the bone tissue breaks down faster than the body can build it back up. Eventually the femoral head collapses and the cartilage withers resulting in arthritis.

Causes of Avascular Necrosis

Hip dislocation
Hip fracture
Diabetes
Sickle Cell Anemia
Kidney Disease
Alcoholism
Prolonged use of steroid medications
Gout
Cancer
Radiation Therapy
Chemotherapy
Gaucher’s Disease
Hip Blood Pressure
Blood Clot

Cartilage

The flexible connective tissue which fills the space in the hip joint. Cartilage is not bony like. It is also more stiff and less flexible than muscle. It acts as a cushion and a lubricant between the two bones allowing us to move without pain.

Femoral Head

The round top of the femur.

Femur

The thigh bone. The bone between the knee and pelvis or hip socket.

Fluoroscopy

Medical imaging technique using X-rays to obtain real moving images of the interior of an object.

Fluoroscopy can be used in the injection of steroid into the joint to aid in pain relief for osteoarthritis of the hip. Fluoscopy imaging assures the injection is placed in the right area of the hip joint without harming other regions.

Additionally, fluoroscopy is used during the direct anterior approach for hip replacement to assure implants are placed correctly and that correct leg lengths are maintained.

Hemi (Half) Replacement

Partial hip replacement is also known as partial hip arthroplasty, hemi-arthroplasty and partial-arthroplasty. In this surgery, only one surface is replaced – the femoral stem – and the natural or existing ‘healthy’ acetabulum is used.

Hip Resurfacing

Hip surgery where the ligaments and cartilage are removed from the diseased or damaged femoral head, smooths it and places a cap over it. The cap may have a short narrow stem that is inserted into a hole drilled into the proximal femur. Ligaments and cartilage are removed from the acetubulum and the area of the pelvic bone is smothed. A metal cup in the placed acetabulum area to accept the new femoral cap.

Metallosis –

pain, swelling and inflammation caused by metal contamination in the bone, tissues and organs. It is believed the condition is caused by the wear of metal implants (cobalt and chromium) released into the blood stream.

Metallosis

Pain, swelling and inflammation after hip replacement surgery caused by metal contamination in the bone, tissues and organs. It is believed the condition is caused by the wear of metal implants (cobalt and chromium) released into the blood stream.

Osteoarthritis

Caused when the cartilage between the bones breaks down. In the case of the hip joint it is the femur (thigh bone) and the hip socket (pelvis).
Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage through aging, injury or obesity. This eventually causes a painful grinding of the two bones together and often bone spurs are created. Osteoarthritis symptoms develop slowly and usually worsen over time.

Partial Hip Replacement

Partial hip arthroplasty, hemi-arthroplasty and partial-arthroplasty. In this surgery, only one surface is replaced – the femoral stem – and the natural or existing ‘healthy’ acetabulum is used.  Usually the surgery is required for someone who has fractured the femoral neck of his or her femur bone. Unlike the term suggests, partial hip replacement is not less invasive and requires the same amount of cutting into the leg by the surgeon. The risks for surgery are the same as total hip replacement.

Proximal Femur

Top of femur or femoral head.

Synovial Fluid

A clear egg white shade fluid produced by the body naturally and found in joint areas. It is often used to lubricate the joint and aids in the lubrication of joint implants.

Total Hip Arthoplasty

Total hip replacement; hip replacement surgery; the procedure of removing the femur head and replacing it with a a prosthetic device. Additionally a prosthetic cup is placed in the acetubulum. The procedure is also known as total hip arthroplasty (THA).